Kathmandu – in a nut shell

Going to Kathmandu? Need Inspiration?

No guide books needed. Just read Pradeep Chamaria’s two entire days in Kathmandu in The Statesman this morning… one of the better ones I have read in a very long time. Not only does he take you through the most important of Kathmandu’s many must-see sights by Tempos, Macros and other local transportation. He also provides enough background information to get an idea behind the sights and – more important – enough to make you want to go!

You really don’t need more information to get an adventurous stay. If you do – just ask around 🙂

The perfect match! From Boudha it's only 20 min walk downhill to Pashupatinath. When you cross Bagmati River to enter the sacred place from the backside you find this small cluster of old Hindu Temples to your left. Don't miss them!
The perfect match! From Boudha it’s only 20 min walk downhill to Pashupatinath. When you cross Bagmati River to enter the sacred place from the backside you find this small cluster of old Hindu Temples to your left. Don’t miss them!

Kathmandu is the easiest and most comfortable place to get in as flights from all over India land here.

I had two entire days with me, so I chose to go around using public transport as much as possible. After meeting my tour operator, Hiking Adventure Treks, to confirm my flight to Lukla for the trek, I set out to explore Kathmandu.

I quickly chalked up a rough list of places to visit, including Pashupati Nath Temple, Thamel, Hanuman- Dhoka Durbar Square (or the Basantpur Durbar), Boudh Stupa and Shanti Stupa. Along with Kathmandu Durbar (Hanuman Dhoka), I also wanted to check out the other two Durbars around Kathmandu ~ Bhaktapur Durbar and Patan Durbar.

As the day progressed, I started hopping from one mini-bus to the other or from one tempo to the other. And an enthralling repository of Nepalese art, history, culture and tradition opened up in front of my eyes and also for my cameras.

READ: Pradeep Chamaria – The Statesman, 26 July 2019

When visiting Bhaktapur – don’t miss the Curd

Good stories in Nepalese Newspapers are rare. A few weeks ago I found a very good one. Thomas Heaton’s story in The Kathmandu Post about the Bhaktapur curd – how it’s made, the tradition behind and the tough condition the producers are up against due to the competition from the industry dairies. If you read this before you go, you add a new dimension to your visit.

If possible try to get up early so you get a chance to see this and witness this hundreds years old tradition.

The curd - or dahi/दही - doesn't get much better than the one they make in Bhaktapur. If you haven't tasted it - you haven't been to Kathmandu.
The curd – or dahi/दही – doesn’t get much better than the one they make in Bhaktapur. If you haven’t tried it, you haven’t been to Kathmandu.

How two brothers are keeping 45 years of culture alive. The Pradhananga brothers in Bhaktapur are using their father’s techniques to make yoghurt that is still winning hearts in the Valley

Mrigendra Pradhananga rummages through his fridge, looking for his culture. Earthen bowls full of juju dhau, stacked atop each other using triangular bamboo dhauka, sit on the large fridge door. Carefully shifting each bowl, he finally finds his culture sitting safely in the bottom. With sweat on his brow from his morning work, he grabs a small pottle of already made juju dhau and spoons the mix into the pitcher of culture. He stirs quickly. This culture dates back 45 years and is the key to their sweet, effervescent juju dhau.

READ: Thomas Heaton – The Kathmandu Post 12 July 2019

Namaste and see you around

Thomas

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